PMBOK Guide 6.0 coming in September

Posted by mikeberry | CAPM,PMP | Tuesday 1 August 2017 12:29 am

September 6, 2017,  PMI will release Version 6 of the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) Guide.  The updates in the new guide reflect slight adjustments to the framework expanding it to encompass managing equipment as well as human resources, and changing terminology from “control” to “monitor” in many areas.  In addition, PMI will publish the new Agile Practice Guide which will become PMI’s definitive resource for all things Agile.   The PMP and CAPM tests will not change until January, 2018.

 

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Knowledge Area Name Changes:

Project Time Management > Project Schedule Management
Project Human Resource Management > Project Resource Management

Process Name Changes:

Plan Stakeholder Management > Plan Stakeholder Engagement (Planning)
Plan Human Resource Management > Plan Resource Management (Planning)
Perform Quality Assurance > Manage Quality (Executing)
Control Communications > Monitor Communications (M&C)
Control Risks > Monitor Risks (M&C)
Control Stakeholder Engagement > Monitor Stakeholder Engagement (M&C)

New Processes:

Manage Project Knowledge (Added to Executing)
Implement Risk Responses (Added to Executing)
Control Resources (Added to M&C)

Deleted processes:

Close Procurement’s

Advice for passing the PMP Exam

Posted by mikeberry | CAPM,PMP,Project Management | Monday 10 December 2012 11:02 pm

The PMP, or Project Management Professional certification, indicates a person possesses years of industry experience participating in projects, and they understand the PMBOK framework.

The PMBOK, or Project Management Body of Knowledge, is a framework comprising 42 processes useful to managing formal projects.

Legendary in the industry, the PMP exam is one of the toughest professional exams out there.  It consists of 200 questions and takes most people the entire 4 hour allotment of time to complete.

The test is put together using Blooms Taxonomy, a learning framework that describes different ways people process learned information.   Recalling lists versus selecting the best option from a set of viable options are examples of categories in Blooms Taxonomy.

One major tip for passing the PMP exam is to expect to be reading questions in street lingo.  For example, the question may be a short story about a manager asking for something from her project manager.  The question will contain no terminology…you will be expected to translate the street lingo into the particular framework component being described and select the correct answer from the choices given.

I teach a PMP Exam Prep class and have many students who pass, and a few who don’t.  What’s the difference?  Quality study time.  Be sure you take this exam seriously so that you can benefit from the PMBOK framework concepts.

Mike J. Berry, PMP, CAPM, CBAP, ITIL, ACP, CSP, CSM, CSPO
John C. Maxwell Leadership Coach

Project Management Institute Announces New PMI-ACP Agile Certification Credential

Agile Certified Practitioner (PMI-ACP) will be the designation of the new PMI Agile credential.  PMI has decided to recognize the prevalence and effectiveness of Agile practices within the project management community and has constructed a tangible foundation of requirements and guidelines for establishing what constitutes an Agile framework.  Perhaps we’ll soon finally see an Agile BOK. Key dates for the PMI-ACP are as follows:(May 2011) PMI is now accepting and reviewing applications for the PMI-ACP (Sep 2011) The PMI-ACP examination will be available(Oct-Dec 2011) The first PMI-ACP certifications will be awarded to successful pilot candidates. Sign up for the PMI-ACP pilot program here:http://www.staging.pmi.org/en/Certification/New-PMI-Agile-Certification/PMI-Agile-Certification-Pilot-Program.aspx

A Free Software Requirements Specification Template (SRS)!

Need a good software requirements specification (SRS) template?  Use an industry-standard SRS.  Can’t find one?  Well now you have-get it here for free.  Enjoy!

Mike J. Berry
www.RedRockResearch.com
Software Development Process Guidance

Book Review: Motivating Employees

Employee motivation is an ever-present concern for most proactive managers.  Interestingly enough, motivation can come from both functional and dysfunctional sources.

I’ve seen employees motivated for many different reasons: recognition, financial incentive, empowerment, personal growth, tension release, fear, and finally there’s that weird Lord of the Flies thing where employees get motivated together against another employee.

In their book, Motivating Employees, Anne Bruce and James S. Pepitone describe the most effective ways to motivate a team.  They describe the three C’s which are vital to functionally motivating employees:

1. Collaboration: Be sure to involve employees in decisions and discussions where their efforts are involved.

2. Content: As they produce suggestions, act on those suggestions immediately.

3. Choice: Be sure to offer choices to your employees–even if you can predict what they will decide.

These three techniques actually empower your employees.   Involving employees in decisions that affect them, or the outcome of what they are working on produces a level of buy-in that is hard to match any other way.

Bruce and Pepitone continue with an examination of Theory-X and Theory-Y motivation and management styles.  These styles were originally presented in the 1960’s by Douglas McGregor.

McGregor states that Theory-X managers proceed from the assumption that their employees are uninformed, lazy, and needy of high-structure.

Theory-Y managers, however, proceed from the assumption that their employees are qualified, intelligent, and capable of making proper decisions provided they are given proper goals, accountability, authority, and resources to accomplish their tasks.

Although Theory-X is the most effective approach during some situations, if you consider the amount of college-educated employees in the workforce today, it’s easy to see how Theory-Y, if applied properly, yields much higher performance.

The authors continue with a formula for encouraging Entrepreneurial Thinking.   Their five-step formula is:

1. Explain the organization
2. Demonstrate how the organization operates and generates income
3. Help your employees understand the competition
4. Encourage intelligent risk-taking
5. Inspire innovative thinking

Another great idea the authors present is to link motivation to performance.  They suggest you develop a written-list of performance standards for meeting and exceeding the expectations you’ve agreed upon during collaborative sessions with them.

The authors talk about how important it is to weave fun into everything your organization does.   This may sound like a unusual suggestion at first, but the authors point out that there is a direct correlation between fun on the job and employee productivity, moral, creativity, satisfaction, and most importantly–retention.

The final few chapters in the book discuss de-motivating factors (or individuals), and how to deal with them.  There is also a good chapter on conducting effective employee-reviews.

Overall I recommend this book to any manager.   It’s a great book to re-read every so often.

Mike J. Berry
www.RedRockResearch.com

Book Review: Under Pressure and On Time

Posted by mikeberry | Book Reviews,Leadership,PMP,Project Management,SDLC Management | Thursday 6 December 2007 11:30 am

Ed Sullivan’s book, Under Pressure And On Time, is a no-nonsense guide for delivering software products to market in a timely manner.

In this industry where the average software project is late, over budget, or a complete failure, there are so many books written about what not to do.  It’s refreshing to read a software development book that tells you “what to do” for a change.

Sullivan skips past conventional theory and provides real-world experiences and wisdom for how project managers and software development teams can succeed in this challenging industry.

Novel to Sullivan’s recommended approaches is the concept of one-team-per-project, reporting to a single manager.  Conventionally, most companies split out development, quality-assurance, and product management into different departments.  Sullivan describres this configuration as a model set-up-for-failure.  Too many factors, he says, complicate team performance when each team-member is reporting to a separate manager.

I consult with software development companies to improve their product delivery speed and product quality.  I call Sullivan’s single-team suggestion the “lean model,” and I agree with his conclusions.

In the manufacturing sciences, there is a belief that the production manager and the quality assurance manager have an inherent conflict of interest, therefore, they should be separate departments within a manufacturing organization.  Many business books are written about this.

In software, however, this model is a less-effective approach.  It can work, but it creates barriers between project teams for several reasons:

  1. Contention can arise as an “us vs them” mentality builds when team-members go back to their respective departments dougouts, to commesurate with their non-project department staff.
  2. As team-members need each other to succeed, it becomes easy for a team-member in one department to delay requests, or grandstand, because their department manager “has asked them to work on other things this week.”
  3. A department manager will tend to be uninformed about upcoming urgent project team needs and may unintentionally delay the project by asking their employee to do other things at the most inconvenient time for the project.
  4. A lack of focus will accompany any project team-member who has continuous department responsibilities outside of the project team.
  5. If contention arises, the project team-members from different departments may value disparaging another department, rather than working together to solve the problem at hand.

Sullivan goes on to discuss effective hiring techniques, retention techniques, and general healthy corporate culture factors.  He talks about ranking employees in terms of inner-circle, middle-circle, and outer-circle.  This reminds me of Jack Welch’s theory on differentation.

Another novel concept Sullivan describes is his simple but effective project scheduling process.  He breaks each month into daily rows, listing team members names as column headers.  Inside of each cell is a letter/number combination representing who needs to be finished with what task on that day.  In my opinion this is much better than a gantt chart.

Sullivan goes on to describe meetings, schedule management, release management, and project closure.

I found this to be a beneficial book to read.  I would recommend reading it topically, as a reference, rather than cover-to-cover.

Mike J Berry
www.RedRockResearch.com